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Our chief areas of interest include drug policy reform, women in prison, racial injustice, the impact of incarceration on children and families, the problems associated with re-entry and stopping the practice of using private prisons in our state.

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Sunday, October 25, 2009

States Pressed Into New role For Marijuana

NY Times
GREELEY, Colo. — Health and law enforcement officials around the nation are scrambling to figure out how to regulate medical marijuana now that the federal government has decided it will no longer prosecute legal users or providers.
For years, since the first medical marijuana laws were passed in the mid-1990s, many local and state governments could be confident, if not complacent, knowing that marijuana would be kept in check because it remained illegal under federal law, and that hard-nosed federal prosecutors were not about to forget it.
But with the Justice Department’s announcement last week that it would not prosecute people who use marijuana for medical purposes in states where it is legal, local and state officials say they will now have to take on the job themselves.
In New Hampshire, for instance, where some state legislators are considering a medical marijuana law, there is concern that the state health department — already battered by budget cuts — could be hard-pressed to administer the system. In California, where there has been an explosion of medical marijuana suppliers, the authorities in Los Angeles and other jurisdictions are considering a requirement that all medical dispensaries operate as nonprofit organizations.
“The federal government says they’re not going to control it, so the only other option we have is to control it ourselves,” said Carrol Martin, a City Council member in this community north of Denver, where a ban on marijuana dispensaries was on the agenda at a Council meeting the day after the federal announcement.
At least five states, including New York and New Jersey, are considering laws to allow medical marijuana through legislation or voter referendums, in addition to the 13 states where such laws already exist. Even while that is happening, scores of local governments in California, Colorado and other states have gone the other way and imposed bans or moratoriums on distribution even though state law allows it.
Some health and legal experts say the Justice Department’s decision will promote the spread of marijuana for medical uses because local and state officials often take leadership cues from federal policy. That, the experts said, could lead to more liberal rules in states that already have medical marijuana and to more voters and legislators in other states becoming comfortable with the idea of allowing it. For elected officials who have feared looking soft on crime by backing any sort of legalized marijuana use, the new policy might provide support to reframe the issue.

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

I listen to all the OFFICIALS who are scrambling to make new laws and write all there rule's. When the hell are these officials going to start listening to WE THE PEOPLE?
Those, officials i am talking about are the ones who have been screwing up our constitution and the will of the majority since 1980 and are responsible for the mess government is in today djw.

Anonymous said...

I listen to all the OFFICIALS who are scrambling to make new laws and write all there rule's. When the hell are these officials going to start listening to WE THE PEOPLE?
Those, officials i am talking about are the ones who have been screwing up our constitution and the will of the majority since 1980 and are responsible for the mess government is in today djw.

Barney said...

Why not just legalize marijuana for all users and make it simple (and less expensive to regulate)? No one seems to be able to answer the questions about what harm there is in marijuana use. It is less harmful than alcohol usage, yet alcohol is legal.